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10
Sep 14

Nature photography offers new light to troubled teens

Ben Thwaits, photographer and counselor takes young boys from Northwest Passage treatment center in the wild along with cameras, as part of an initiative named In a New Light. Recently, a Wisconsin based televiusion spoke to Ben for their Wisconsin Life series to learn more regarding helping teenagers gain confidence via art.
Since he was sixteen years old, Thwaits has developed a love for nature photography. For 2 long years, he worked as a pro photographer before he started teaching at risk kids at a residential treatment place in north Wisconsin named Northwest Passage.
Encircles by pristine lakes, the St. Croix River and dense forests, Ben started looking for paths to bring nature photography in his classroom. With a grant from National Parks Foundation, he purchased few digital cameras as well as other important software. Very soon, he was guiding students up rocky bluffs and into creek beds.
Ben told that within just 3 – 4 weeks, they actually realized that that they were onto something very special, because these children started investing into their photography on a level that is way beyond anything he has ever seen on any school program. In fact, the kids started to take real magnificent snaps.
One of the students told that it is a way to express herself without actually talking to people, because she does not like to talk to people at times.
In the In a New Light program, students have visited national parks across the country to take snaps, and their photogrsaphic works have been shown across the Midland.

Ben Thwaits, photographer and counselor takes young boys from Northwest Passage treatment center in the wild along with cameras, as part of an initiative named In a New Light. Recently, a Wisconsin based televiusion spoke to Ben for their Wisconsin Life series to learn more regarding helping teenagers gain confidence via art.

Since he was sixteen years old, Thwaits has developed a love for nature photography. For 2 long years, he worked as a pro photographer before he started teaching at risk kids at a residential treatment place in north Wisconsin named Northwest Passage.

Encircles by pristine lakes, the St. Croix River and dense forests, Ben started looking for paths to bring nature photography in his classroom. With a grant from National Parks Foundation, he purchased few digital cameras as well as other important software. Very soon, he was guiding students up rocky bluffs and into creek beds.

Ben told that within just 3 – 4 weeks, they actually realized that that they were onto something very special, because these children started investing into their photography on a level that is way beyond anything he has ever seen on any school program. In fact, the kids started to take real magnificent snaps.

One of the students told that it is a way to express herself without actually talking to people, because she does not like to talk to people at times.

In the In a New Light program, students have visited national parks across the country to take snaps, and their photogrsaphic works have been shown across the Midland.


7
Aug 14

Winners in the North East wildlife photo contest

A photographer from County Durham has snatched the top spot in North East Wildlife Photography contest this year. Leslie Holburn’s picture of 2 pairs of coots battling on the Sled Lane pond in the Crawcrook in Gateshead made him the winner of North East Wildlife Photography contest 2014.
Semi-retired jeweler Leslie Holburn’s gem of a snap also won him Wildlife in Action category of the contest at the awards event at Newcastle’s Great North Museum. The contest, operated by wildlife trusts of Durham, Tees Valley, and Northumberland and Natural History Society of Northumbria, pull in 1289 entries.
Leslie Holburn are known for their feisty and aggressive attitude during the breeding season. Leslie, who currently lives in Ebchester in County Durham, told that he clicked the snap in the spring at the Sled Lane pond and the coots were kicking off again. They are so unsociable. They are the neighbors from hell. They chase everything.
He added that on his visit to the pond, the coots were quite edgy as usual. To get 4 coots in the snap as if they were synchronized was a bonus. It showed their typical confrontational behavior.
Coots were the center of attraction again when a more sedate snap of a chick and mother, clicked at the WWT Washington Wetland Centre by Max Eve, who is from Bardon Mill in Northumberland. He received the award for Young Person’s section. Stuart Proud, from Humshaugh in Northumberland, won the award for Art in Nature, for his research of the structure of a decayed leaf that he found while walking in Riding Mill.

A photographer from County Durham has snatched the top spot in North East Wildlife Photography contest this year. Leslie Holburn’s picture of 2 pairs of coots battling on the Sled Lane pond in the Crawcrook in Gateshead made him the winner of North East Wildlife Photography contest 2014.

Semi-retired jeweler Leslie Holburn’s gem of a snap also won him Wildlife in Action category of the contest at the awards event at Newcastle’s Great North Museum. The contest, operated by wildlife trusts of Durham, Tees Valley, and Northumberland and Natural History Society of Northumbria, pull in 1289 entries.

Leslie Holburn are known for their feisty and aggressive attitude during the breeding season. Leslie, who currently lives in Ebchester in County Durham, told that he clicked the snap in the spring at the Sled Lane pond and the coots were kicking off again. They are so unsociable. They are the neighbors from hell. They chase everything.

He added that on his visit to the pond, the coots were quite edgy as usual. To get 4 coots in the snap as if they were synchronized was a bonus. It showed their typical confrontational behavior.

Coots were the center of attraction again when a more sedate snap of a chick and mother, clicked at the WWT Washington Wetland Centre by Max Eve, who is from Bardon Mill in Northumberland. He received the award for Young Person’s section. Stuart Proud, from Humshaugh in Northumberland, won the award for Art in Nature, for his research of the structure of a decayed leaf that he found while walking in Riding Mill.


20
Jun 14

Photographer uses aftershave to tempt lions to his lens

A Wildlife photographer has muster up with a great way of getting up close and personal with the pack lions he wants to take pictures of – i.e. by luring the deadly species with his Old Spice aftershave. David Yarrow has been photographing these African cats for a long time. He utilized smell to attract the wild species to his remote cameras to take their snaps.
Speaking about how he took those snaps, the self taught photographer told that the placing of remotes at sunrise is a low-percentage and dangerous pursuit near lions. Well, he had some unsuccessful mornings. He covered the camera casing in Old Spice stick aftershave, as his guide knew that lions were attracted by that smell because earlier have worn this smell for years. It worked great. The lioness came ahead towards the camera against a clear backdrop.
The black and white snaps, which also have another picture of a lion resting just after killing and eating its prey, would be released when Yarrow delivers the very first Tusk Conservation Lecture at Christie’s on 30th April in London.
David told that this lion had just killed and eaten and his demeanor is both sated and content. However he is alert – his right eye is very telling and grabs our focus in the picture. Having a look at this snap could hardly make you think that the king of Africa is under threat. The scenario has altered highly in the past fifteen years; the population of lions in Kenya has dropped from 15000 to 2000 with hundred lions missing each year.

A Wildlife photographer has muster up with a great way of getting up close and personal with the pack lions he wants to take pictures of – i.e. by luring the deadly species with his Old Spice aftershave. David Yarrow has been photographing these African cats for a long time. He utilized smell to attract the wild species to his remote cameras to take their snaps.

Speaking about how he took those snaps, the self taught photographer told that the placing of remotes at sunrise is a low-percentage and dangerous pursuit near lions. Well, he had some unsuccessful mornings. He covered the camera casing in Old Spice stick aftershave, as his guide knew that lions were attracted by that smell because earlier have worn this smell for years. It worked great. The lioness came ahead towards the camera against a clear backdrop.

The black and white snaps, which also have another picture of a lion resting just after killing and eating its prey, would be released when Yarrow delivers the very first Tusk Conservation Lecture at Christie’s on 30th April in London.

David told that this lion had just killed and eaten and his demeanor is both sated and content. However he is alert – his right eye is very telling and grabs our focus in the picture. Having a look at this snap could hardly make you think that the king of Africa is under threat. The scenario has altered highly in the past fifteen years; the population of lions in Kenya has dropped from 15000 to 2000 with hundred lions missing each year.


7
Mar 14

Wildlife photo winners announced

NC Wildlife Resources Commission has declared the name of the winners of 9th Wildlife in North Carolina magazine photo contest. Garner’s Paul Malcolm won the grand award for his snap of live oak trees at the Fort Fisher site, which is near Wilmington. Paul plays viola with North Carolina Symphony. He is also a previous picture contest winner. In the year 2010, he snatched the 1st spot in Wild Landscapes category.

He told that when he took a snap, he is not documenting a scene; he is clicking a mood or a feeling. He is looking at some originative way to convey what he feels and see regarding the subject. Photography and music are both creative warmth. In concert, he emotionally gets involved. He gets involved in photography as he relishes taking snaps.

All the winners were published in 2014’s January/February’s Wildlife in North Carolina issue, with Malcolm’s grand prize image hitting the cover. http://www.kerratarchitects.co.uk/, the exhibit sponsor, made it possible for the snaps to be displayed at NC Museum of Natural Sciences in March.

Jim Wilson, the Wildlife in North Carolina editor, stated that there were snaps from each corner of the state, showing the diverse habitats of the natural resources which are covered in each issue of the mag. The photo contest nurtures a greater appreciation and understanding of the wildlife and wild of North Carolina.


7
Jan 14

Teens utilize photography

Taking part in a program named PhotoVoice, students assembled every week for twelve long weeks. There they learned about photography skills, reviewed each others work as well as offering constructive comment on each other’s work. With digital storytelling, the students were boosted to share their views on the topics of underage drinking as well as giving voice to their perspectives.

PhotoVoice, at the Homer Middle School, was integrated into the yearbook class of Rand Seaton. 16 students took part in that, including fourteen year old Sarah Wolf, who told that she learned the importance of making ways that the eye can go after when she is taking a snap. These are known as leading lines, and now she sees them everywhere. Continue reading →


17
Oct 13

WUFT-FM Florida’s 89.1 anniversary; photographic collaboration

WUFT-FM Florida’s 89.1, a public radio station, will honor their thirty-second year with limited edition poster with snaps of photographers David Moynahan and John Moran. Oasis in the Dark/Suwannee River will be a vertical poster available in WUFT FM membership cause from 7th October to 18th October.

John Moran, a University of Florida alumnus, clicks pictures wildlife and landscapes with an the water of the state’s – coasts, swamps, the rivers, lakes and springs, as well as the creatures which inhabit them. John was named as the official state photographer of Florida in the year 2007 and his snaps has appeared in several top magazines including Life, National Geographic, Smithsonian, New York Times Magazine and Time.

After the twenty three year career as a writer, photographer and editor for Gainesville Sun. In the year 2003, John Moran left the daily journalism world to focus full time on taking snaps the best of disappearing natural Florida.

David Moynahan is a conservation snapper whose snaps help preach for preservation of the wild places of the earth. He got awards at 2011 Nature’s Best Photography Windland Smith Rice Awards as well as their staff snapper for the Office of Recreation Services of Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. His pictures have come on several guides and books regarding the public land of Florida. The poster will be accessible during the cause with a set of 4 note cards boasting Florida springs after dark. The cards and the poster will be available for a US$ 120 donation to public radio.


28
Aug 13

Lewandowski’s photographs are on display

Forty-nine year old boilermaker Mike Lewandowski has an interest in photography. The Highland man caught the attention with his nesting Calumet eagles’ snaps. Two of his photographs are on display at Paul Henry’s Art Gallery in Hammond.

Paul Henry’s owner Dave Mueller told that he had an exceptionally decent camera, and he is starting out. He does wildlife, cars and cemeteries. Mike is Catholic, and Dave got him to do the church. He figured that it was a very good project for Mike. That the project is now on display at the Blue Room Cafe in Hammond.
Two of his favorite snaps are – Graveyard Pony, which is a Mustang by a graveyard; and 9-11, which is a Calumet eagle snap.

Mike Lewandowski told that he always preferred to take snaps. He got a decent camera few years back. Earlier he had a good Canon camera. Then one day he tipped while taking snaps of eagles in his kayak and his came also went with him.

After graduating from Highland High, Mike joined the Navy. Even then, he went on to learn art and photography and his inspiration was local photographer and artist Lora Mercado. He always loved nature since he was a kid. Mike loves fishing, and he even has a fishing trailer. He stated that apart from his son, the lake would probably be his legacy. This is not thing for money-making, but it is nice.


13
Jun 13

Conflict photography of Benjamin Lowy

Benjamin Lowy, a well known photojournalist, creates snaps of great beauty while working in the deepest corners of the planet where conflict reigns. For the Sydney Writers’ Festival as well as the Head On Photography Festival, Lowy speaks with Pip Cummings about art, beauty, and ethics in photojournalism.

Even when Benjamin Lowy was a kid, he used to go to New York’s Jones Beach to see the 3.5 metre swells which had been sickenby Hurricane Gloria. He told that he ran right into the ocean and that probably explains a little bit about who he is.

33 year old Lowy is a well known conflict photographer, whose pictures from  Afghanistan, Libya, Iraq and Darfur have been hailed by the Magnum Foundation Emergency fund, World Press Photo as well as the ICP Infinity Award for Photojournalism. His snaps were also exhibited at San Francisco’s Museum of Modern Art and the Tate Modern.

His love for photography was discovered by accident. Both his mom and grandmother were good painters and Benjamin always knew he really wanted to work in arts field. He told that he was also a kind of daydreamer, always reading science fiction, looking at comic books as a child.

He was studying to be a comic book illustrator and he often relied on drawing figures from photography books and one day he pulled well known photojournalist James Nachtwey’s Inferno and the die was cast. He told that he sat there for several hours and just looked at those snaps and it altered something inside of me.


24
Apr 13

Photography accessory firm shifts

A well known Italian photography accessory firm has moved their US headquarters to a bigger facility in the Upper Saddle River. Earlier it was in Ramsey, now this move will help to offer room for expanding upon in an industry which has experienced a growth of amateur hobbyists.

Manfrotto Distribution that finished moving its fifty United States employees into their new place in December but arranged its opening in Upper Saddle River last Wednesday. The new place which is a mile from its old place has got room for seventy five employees, stated William Drysdale, who is the managing director of Manfrotto Distribution US.

In Ramsey, the earlier facility had nine thousand square feet office space as well as forty thousand square feet warehouse place. The location of the Upper Saddle River has sixteen thousand square feet office space, but Manfrotto shifted its warehousing to a more flexible space house at Panalpina in Secaucus. That place is twenty thousand square feet, as well as Manfrotto gets around fifty thousand square feet, with the power to contract or expand space as required, stated Drysdale.

When the warehouse was shifted to Secaucus, around twenty workers were allowed to go, but they were asked to look for jobs at Panalpina, said Drysdale. He added that most of them were transferred over to the 3rd party partner. Those jobs stayed secure, just not under their corporate facility.


15
Mar 13

Dorset Wildlife Trust’s photography contest

Young people are being asked to take their cameras or mobile phones to click top shots of wildlife in this spring. Dorset Wildlife Trust are looking for pictures for its monthly photographic contest for under-18s.

Dorset Wildlife Trust’s community conservation officer Catherine Mason told that The Pat Dolbear Photographic Award for Young People targets to get more young people interested in some of their smaller nature by using their digital cameras or mobile phones.

This award is photographer Ken Dolbear’s brainchild. He is a long-standing member of DWT and he is dedicated to the memory of his wife Pat. Catherine insists that people often overlook smaller creatures around us, therefore, it is time that people give a proper look at at them. She suggested to look at the sheltered spots like under logs for species hiding from the cold, or venture out on a sunny day and find an early bumble bee or beetle.

Prizes (up to £25 Amazon gift tokens) are handed to one or more of the photographers who, in the opinion of the judges, submit the best work each month. The monthly winners as well as runners-up work will be posted on Facebook and Twitter and more importantly it may also feature in DWT’s e-news bulletin Wildlife Matters.

3 students from Salisbury’s St Edmund’s School won the January wildlife photography prize for their pictures taken on Brownsea Island. Hannah Hutchby and Holly Lucas were among the winners, and Lauren Humphries was the runner up.