19
Nov 14

Documentary Photography: Tips & Advice by Daniel Milnor

Pictures Online video Score: 4 / 5


21
Oct 14

Wedding & Portrait Photography Tips & Advice by Bambi Cantrell

Images Video clip Ranking: 4 / five


23
Sep 14

Demo Reel – Wedding Photographers Elmira NY – Wedding Videography Elmira NY – Video Production – DJ

Images Video Rating: / five


10
Sep 14

Nature photography offers new light to troubled teens

Ben Thwaits, photographer and counselor takes young boys from Northwest Passage treatment center in the wild along with cameras, as part of an initiative named In a New Light. Recently, a Wisconsin based televiusion spoke to Ben for their Wisconsin Life series to learn more regarding helping teenagers gain confidence via art.
Since he was sixteen years old, Thwaits has developed a love for nature photography. For 2 long years, he worked as a pro photographer before he started teaching at risk kids at a residential treatment place in north Wisconsin named Northwest Passage.
Encircles by pristine lakes, the St. Croix River and dense forests, Ben started looking for paths to bring nature photography in his classroom. With a grant from National Parks Foundation, he purchased few digital cameras as well as other important software. Very soon, he was guiding students up rocky bluffs and into creek beds.
Ben told that within just 3 – 4 weeks, they actually realized that that they were onto something very special, because these children started investing into their photography on a level that is way beyond anything he has ever seen on any school program. In fact, the kids started to take real magnificent snaps.
One of the students told that it is a way to express herself without actually talking to people, because she does not like to talk to people at times.
In the In a New Light program, students have visited national parks across the country to take snaps, and their photogrsaphic works have been shown across the Midland.

Ben Thwaits, photographer and counselor takes young boys from Northwest Passage treatment center in the wild along with cameras, as part of an initiative named In a New Light. Recently, a Wisconsin based televiusion spoke to Ben for their Wisconsin Life series to learn more regarding helping teenagers gain confidence via art.

Since he was sixteen years old, Thwaits has developed a love for nature photography. For 2 long years, he worked as a pro photographer before he started teaching at risk kids at a residential treatment place in north Wisconsin named Northwest Passage.

Encircles by pristine lakes, the St. Croix River and dense forests, Ben started looking for paths to bring nature photography in his classroom. With a grant from National Parks Foundation, he purchased few digital cameras as well as other important software. Very soon, he was guiding students up rocky bluffs and into creek beds.

Ben told that within just 3 – 4 weeks, they actually realized that that they were onto something very special, because these children started investing into their photography on a level that is way beyond anything he has ever seen on any school program. In fact, the kids started to take real magnificent snaps.

One of the students told that it is a way to express herself without actually talking to people, because she does not like to talk to people at times.

In the In a New Light program, students have visited national parks across the country to take snaps, and their photogrsaphic works have been shown across the Midland.


26
Aug 14

Travel Photography: Tips and Techniques

Photography Video clip Score: 4 / 5


07
Aug 14

Winners in the North East wildlife photo contest

A photographer from County Durham has snatched the top spot in North East Wildlife Photography contest this year. Leslie Holburn’s picture of 2 pairs of coots battling on the Sled Lane pond in the Crawcrook in Gateshead made him the winner of North East Wildlife Photography contest 2014.
Semi-retired jeweler Leslie Holburn’s gem of a snap also won him Wildlife in Action category of the contest at the awards event at Newcastle’s Great North Museum. The contest, operated by wildlife trusts of Durham, Tees Valley, and Northumberland and Natural History Society of Northumbria, pull in 1289 entries.
Leslie Holburn are known for their feisty and aggressive attitude during the breeding season. Leslie, who currently lives in Ebchester in County Durham, told that he clicked the snap in the spring at the Sled Lane pond and the coots were kicking off again. They are so unsociable. They are the neighbors from hell. They chase everything.
He added that on his visit to the pond, the coots were quite edgy as usual. To get 4 coots in the snap as if they were synchronized was a bonus. It showed their typical confrontational behavior.
Coots were the center of attraction again when a more sedate snap of a chick and mother, clicked at the WWT Washington Wetland Centre by Max Eve, who is from Bardon Mill in Northumberland. He received the award for Young Person’s section. Stuart Proud, from Humshaugh in Northumberland, won the award for Art in Nature, for his research of the structure of a decayed leaf that he found while walking in Riding Mill.

A photographer from County Durham has snatched the top spot in North East Wildlife Photography contest this year. Leslie Holburn’s picture of 2 pairs of coots battling on the Sled Lane pond in the Crawcrook in Gateshead made him the winner of North East Wildlife Photography contest 2014.

Semi-retired jeweler Leslie Holburn’s gem of a snap also won him Wildlife in Action category of the contest at the awards event at Newcastle’s Great North Museum. The contest, operated by wildlife trusts of Durham, Tees Valley, and Northumberland and Natural History Society of Northumbria, pull in 1289 entries.

Leslie Holburn are known for their feisty and aggressive attitude during the breeding season. Leslie, who currently lives in Ebchester in County Durham, told that he clicked the snap in the spring at the Sled Lane pond and the coots were kicking off again. They are so unsociable. They are the neighbors from hell. They chase everything.

He added that on his visit to the pond, the coots were quite edgy as usual. To get 4 coots in the snap as if they were synchronized was a bonus. It showed their typical confrontational behavior.

Coots were the center of attraction again when a more sedate snap of a chick and mother, clicked at the WWT Washington Wetland Centre by Max Eve, who is from Bardon Mill in Northumberland. He received the award for Young Person’s section. Stuart Proud, from Humshaugh in Northumberland, won the award for Art in Nature, for his research of the structure of a decayed leaf that he found while walking in Riding Mill.


29
Jul 14

BEST OF WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHY

Images Online video Ranking: 4 / five


30
Jun 14

Headshot Photograph Tips : How to Become a Better Photographer

Pictures Video Score: five / 5


20
Jun 14

Photographer uses aftershave to tempt lions to his lens

A Wildlife photographer has muster up with a great way of getting up close and personal with the pack lions he wants to take pictures of – i.e. by luring the deadly species with his Old Spice aftershave. David Yarrow has been photographing these African cats for a long time. He utilized smell to attract the wild species to his remote cameras to take their snaps.
Speaking about how he took those snaps, the self taught photographer told that the placing of remotes at sunrise is a low-percentage and dangerous pursuit near lions. Well, he had some unsuccessful mornings. He covered the camera casing in Old Spice stick aftershave, as his guide knew that lions were attracted by that smell because earlier have worn this smell for years. It worked great. The lioness came ahead towards the camera against a clear backdrop.
The black and white snaps, which also have another picture of a lion resting just after killing and eating its prey, would be released when Yarrow delivers the very first Tusk Conservation Lecture at Christie’s on 30th April in London.
David told that this lion had just killed and eaten and his demeanor is both sated and content. However he is alert – his right eye is very telling and grabs our focus in the picture. Having a look at this snap could hardly make you think that the king of Africa is under threat. The scenario has altered highly in the past fifteen years; the population of lions in Kenya has dropped from 15000 to 2000 with hundred lions missing each year.

A Wildlife photographer has muster up with a great way of getting up close and personal with the pack lions he wants to take pictures of – i.e. by luring the deadly species with his Old Spice aftershave. David Yarrow has been photographing these African cats for a long time. He utilized smell to attract the wild species to his remote cameras to take their snaps.

Speaking about how he took those snaps, the self taught photographer told that the placing of remotes at sunrise is a low-percentage and dangerous pursuit near lions. Well, he had some unsuccessful mornings. He covered the camera casing in Old Spice stick aftershave, as his guide knew that lions were attracted by that smell because earlier have worn this smell for years. It worked great. The lioness came ahead towards the camera against a clear backdrop.

The black and white snaps, which also have another picture of a lion resting just after killing and eating its prey, would be released when Yarrow delivers the very first Tusk Conservation Lecture at Christie’s on 30th April in London.

David told that this lion had just killed and eaten and his demeanor is both sated and content. However he is alert – his right eye is very telling and grabs our focus in the picture. Having a look at this snap could hardly make you think that the king of Africa is under threat. The scenario has altered highly in the past fifteen years; the population of lions in Kenya has dropped from 15000 to 2000 with hundred lions missing each year.


02
Jun 14

Pet Photography: Tips & Tricks Tip 22

Photography Video clip Score: 4 / five